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May 20, 2016

CCI - Dissertation - Nina Eide Hasselberg


 

Nina Eide Hasselberg, medical doctor and PhD fellow at the CCI and the Dept of Cardiology, Rikshospitalet, defended her PhD-thesis «Echocardiographic assessment of left ventricular function and clinical outcome in heart failure» on Wednesday April 27th 2016.
Her supervisors have been associate professor Kristina H. Haugaa, MD, PhD and Professor Thor Edvardsen, MD, PhD.

The PhD-thesis consists of echocardiographic studies investigating how speckle-tracking strain can assess myocardial function and prognosis in patients with heart failure.

In summary, Hasselberg and co-workers conclude that echocardiographic strain can identify regional and global myocardial dysfunction and assess the risk of harmful events in heart failure. Their results promote the use of strain as part of disease monitoring and as a diagnostic and prognostic tool to better choose correct treatment in heart failure patients.

Posted by: Anonymous

Text by Nina Eide Hasselberg

 

Nina Eide Hasselberg, medical doctor and PhD fellow at the CCI and the Dept of Cardiology, Rikshospitalet, defended her PhD-thesis «Echocardiographic assessment of left ventricular function and clinical outcome in heart failure» on Wednesday April 27th 2016.
Her supervisors have been associate professor Kristina H. Haugaa, MD, PhD and Professor Thor Edvardsen, MD, PhD.
Participating in the evaluation commitee were Professor Jutta-Bergler Klein, associate professor Ruxandra Oana Jurcut and Professor emeritus Knut Gjesdal.


During her time as a PhD fellow at the CCI, Hasselberg has been the first author for the following atricles:

Left ventricular markers of mortality and ventricular arrhythmias in heart failure patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy.
Hasselberg NE, Haugaa KH, Bernard A, Ribe MP, Kongsgaard E, Donal E, Edvardsen T
Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging. 2016 Mar;17(3):343-50
doi: 10.1093/ehjci/jev173
PMID: 26164406

Left ventricular global longitudinal strain is associated with exercise capacity in failing hearts with preserved and reduced ejection fraction.
Hasselberg NE, Haugaa KH, Sarvari SI, Gullestad L, Andreassen AK, Smiseth OA, Edvardsen T
Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging. 2015 Feb;16(2):217-24
doi: 10.1093/ehjci/jeu277
PMID: 25552469

Risk prediction of ventricular arrhythmias and myocardial function in Lamin A/C mutation positive subjects.
Hasselberg NE, Edvardsen T, Petri H, Berge KE, Leren TP, Bundgaard H, Haugaa KH
Europace. 2014 Apr;16(4):563-71. doi: 10.1093/europace/eut291
PMID: 24058181

 

The PhD-thesis consists of echocardiographic studies investigating how speckle-tracking strain can assess myocardial function and prognosis in patients with heart failure.

In summary, Hasselberg and co-workers conclude that echocardiographic strain can identify regional and global myocardial dysfunction and assess the risk of harmful events in heart failure. Their results promote the use of strain as part of disease monitoring and as a diagnostic and prognostic tool to better choose correct treatment in heart failure patients.

Nina Eide Hasselberg during her defense.

Exercise capacity is known to have high prognostic impact in heart failure, but previous studies have failed to show its correlation to systolic function by ejection fraction (EF). Hasselberg and co-workers showed that myocardial function by strain correlated closely to exercise capacity by peakVO2 (oxygen uptake), in heart failure patients with reduced EF and importantly and never previously shown, also in patients with preserved EF (HFpEF). In HFpEF patients strain could reveal reduced systolic function and a systolic-diastolic function.

In a prospective study of patients with a cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) pacemaker, global longitudinal strain was an independent predictor of risk of 2-year mortality, in line with CRT response by reverse remodeling. Furthermore, lack of resynchronization by the CRT after 6 months, assessed by mechanical dispersion from strain, was a strong predictor of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. This has clinical relevance since treatment should be optimized according to risk, including implanting an implantable cardiac defibrillator in those patients with the highest risk of sudden cardiac death.

Professor Jutta-Bergler Klein was one of Nina's opponents during the defence.

In the heritable Lamin A/C cardiomyopathy, they found that PR-interval and conduction disease documented on electrocardiogram (ECG) was the best predictor of ventricular arrhythmias. Strain echocardiography on the other hand, identified regional myocardial dysfunction that correlated to PR-interval, providing new insight into the pathogenesis of this severe disease.

The majority of heart failure patients included in the studies was recruited at the Dept of Cardiology, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital. The research group also collaborated with Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen and Centre Universitaire de Rennes in France.

 

Nina Hasselberg, MD, PhD together with Professor Thor Edvardsen, Associate professor Kristina Haugaa and two of Hasselberg's opponents Associate professor Ruxandra Oana Jurcut and Professor Jutta-Bergler Klein.

Center for Cardiological Innovation